Issue #205 – Should I Buy Doomtown: Reloaded?

 

The Best in Board Games – In 5 Minutes or Less!
July 30, 2014 – Issue #205

TOP NEWS

HOT DEALS

Giveaways, specials, and freebies
KICKSTARTER CORNER

In the Game

Reviews, previews, walkthroughs, and more…
Today In Board Games Is:Roger Hicks (Editor)
Charlie Ecenbarger (Contributor)
Michelle Mazala (Contributor)
Chris Meeusen (Contributor)
Diana Echevarria (Communications)

Articles

Interviews, strategies, and opinions

Should I Buy This?


Doomtown: Reloaded (2014)
Publisher:
 Alderac Entertainment Group
Details: 2-4 Players, 30 Minutes
Surveyed Gamers Say:
41% – Plan to Buy It
23% – Will Try It First
09% – Might Play It
27% – Don’t Want ItBuy This If You Like:
Android: Netrunner, L5R, Magic: The Gathering
Coming Next Issue

Panamax
Are you planning to buy this game or are you not interested? Give us your opinion!

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By |July 30th, 2014|Issue|Comments Off on Issue #205 – Should I Buy Doomtown: Reloaded?

Far Space Foundry Press Release

By |July 30th, 2014|Press Releases|Comments Off on Far Space Foundry Press Release

Interview with Alex Gregory designer of The Lounge: A Mafia Game

The Lounge_LogoShaded_AMafiaGame

Today’s interview is with Alex Gregory designer of The Lounge: A Mafia Game.

Give us an overview of your game and how it’s played.

The Lounge is a Mafia/Werewolf game. If you have heard of the popular social deduction games, then you already know how to play The Lounge. If not, that’s ok! At its core, The Lounge is a game about an uninformed majority (The Town), facing off against an informed minority (The Mafia).

The Lounge also has 22 unique 3rd Party roles. These roles have goals that may not involve the Town or the Mafia. For instance, the Serial Killer simply wants to be the last man standing; The Cowboy wants to shoot the final Mafia member. These 3rd Party roles can win on their own, or with the town occasionally.

The game is split between night and day rounds. During the night round, the moderator “wakes up” players, and have them use their role’s power. For instance, the Mafia as a group choose someone to eliminate from the game. The Detective chooses someone, and the moderator lets them know if that person is part of the Mafia or not. Once the night round is finished, the game moves into a day round, where people speculate on who is in the Mafia, and nominate those people. At the end of a day round (usually about 3-5 minutes), players vote on those nominated, and if one person receives a majority of the votes, they are eliminated. The next night round then begins. This continues until either the Town has eliminated all threats, a 3rd Party role has met their win condition, or the Mafia has gained a majority in the town.

The game comes with 108 beautifully drawn cards with over 80 unique roles; a comprehensive rulebook that includes suggestions for setting up games, how to run the night and day rounds, and other game modes, as well as rules clarification on the roles, and rulings on specific interactions; and a Red and Gold D10 dice, which is used for certain roles like King Ramses, the Robot, and the Werewolf. The Lounge will launch on Kickstarter on August 5th.

What innovative mechanic or creative idea distinguishes your game from others?

Most Mafia/Werewolf sets are actually quite simple. 30-40 cards, 5-10 roles, with just the name of the role on the card and some artwork to make it nice to look at. That’s it. Ultimate Werewolf is different in that they are the “Ultimate” set. They have 40-60 different roles, a really nice rulebook, and the rules for each role is on the card; no need for clarifications from the moderator to bog the game down. The Lounge? It has 108 cards and over 80 different roles to play as. It has enough diversity in roles to put in games to never grow stale. The interactions between each role, and the different ways to play each role mean that even in the exact same setup, each game will be different. The diversity is what makes my game unique.

Additionally, The Lounge has more of a Focus on “3rd Party Roles” than the other games out there. Most focus on the dynamic between the town and the Mafia/Werewolf teams, with a few cards thrown in for 3rd parties. The Lounge splits equally between Mafia and 3rd Party. I did this because 3rd party roles are fun. That’s the simple truth behind it. Building up a vampire following, picking off people each night as a serial killer, or trying to get yourself voted off during the day can be amazing fun, and it is a part of the game that I think goes underappreciated compared to the Town/Mafia Dynamic. People enjoy playing as the lone star, one-vs-all person, and I have catered to that.

Tell us about the spark or inspiration for this game.

I talk on how and why I decided to create the game in the next section, so instead I will talk of why the game is themed and named the way it is. This is actually something I have been asked a fair amount, and so I think it would be good if I share the story. I have lived in a college dorm the past couple of years, and one of the best places to socialize there is in the dorm lounge. My friends and I would often gather there, and talk, play board games, and do homework. It is also the place where we would go to play Mafia. So, just on a whim, when I was first prototyping the game, I just called it The Lounge. I didn’t really intend for the name to stick. However, I was trying to think of a theme for the game (I went through Bayou/Cajun, super grayscale city, generic fantasy town), and it came to me. A 1920’s speakeasy! It was a really good setting for most of these characters, and for the game to take place. The theme fit, and the name stuck. In hindsight, I am really glad that I decided on this path, as I think that the cards look gorgeous, and the theming really fits the feeling that I want them to give off.

Let’s talk about the design process. Tell us a bit about the iterations the game has gone through and the refinements you’ve made along the way.

The game has gone through about 4 stages. The first stage was from when I started playing Mafia to about November of 2013. During this time I played Mafia with a group of people every Monday. It was fun, great times were shared by all; overall a nice way to spend a Monday evening. We used playing cards to denote the roles (i.e. King of Hearts was the Voodoo Lady), and each week we would try a new role, or another way of playing the game (Two Towns was my favorite).

About November of 2013, a friend of mine created some custom cards. He printed off 40 cards that he made on GIMP, and put them in a sleeve backed with a Magic card. It was an absolute innovation to the way we played the game. Instead of having to explain the rules each time we played a role, and what card it was, it was now all on the cards. We went from 2 games every three hours to 6 games in the same amount of time. It was fantastic. Now, you will notice that it wasn’t me who made these cards. In January, after playing with them for a couple months, I wanted to expand the list of roles we had available. However, my friend was starting to get really busy with schoolwork, and was unable to make any more cards. So, I started to make my own. At first I was going to follow his design, but I started making improvements to it, among other things.

This is where the third stage comes in. I created a template for myself, and even used my meager art skills to put a face on each card. It took me about two months, but by the beginning of March I had a set of 108 cards that spanned 82 roles. About halfway through this process is when I started looking into marketing it as a product. When I finished creating all of the cards, I sent them off to TheGameCrafter to print me off a copy, along with a box and a rudimentary rulebook. By the time I got them back I was dead set on trying to make this an actual game on the market, and not have it “die” in just my hands. I was convinced when I showed it to my group and we started playing with the cards; it was a huge hit with them. And so I started looking for an artist.

Stage 4 is where I am at currently. After testing the roles a bit with my group, I added some and took away those that were either too complex or not as popular. I commissioned a professional illustrator to do the graphic design and artwork, and I do believe that they did a better job than my first try at it (Just maybe). In any case, the game is now ready to be published, pending a successful run on Kickstarter.

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What has been your biggest challenge in designing this game?

I’m not going to lie, creating the set of roles and setting up the rules wasn’t too difficult, simply because I already had something to work with. Mafia is a thriving game already, and I am simply adding to it. What was difficult, was taking those roles and rules from the drawing board and my head, and creating a product and business plan from them. I had no idea what I was doing to start out. I had heard of Kickstarter, and thought it would be a good place to launch the game from, but I had no idea that such a vibrant and thriving community of game designers existed there. But once I learned of that, I started researching. The knowledge gap that I had to bridge was probably the hardest part in this entire process. I spent months alternating between working on a prototype and researching everything from game design to good Kickstarter practices to opening and owning a business. I must have spent a week binge reading Jamey Stegmaier’s Kickstarter lessons. If you are even considering game design and Kickstarter, I’d recommend doing the same thing, those posts are invaluable.

Let’s shift gears and talk about you. How did you get into game design?

As a kid, I always loved creating things. LEGOs and K’nex were my favorite toys, and I am sure I annoyed my parents by leaving out all of the giant structures that I was making. As I grew older, that passion for creating never died, it simply evolved into other things. In high school I stumbled upon programming, and I spent a lot of time writing coded games. Once I got to college the programming of dropped off a bit, but I didn’t lose that passion for creating. It was around this past January that I decided to look into creating a custom card set for our Mafia games. Rather than stop it at just a game for our group, I did a bit of research, and found out that I could make this into a business and a product. And that is what started the process.

What is your greatest moment as a game designer?

My greatest moment as a game designer is probably when I received the first sketch of the Jester Card. It was the first piece of artwork I had received, and it was the moment for me when it hit that this was happening. And that was exciting! I shared the picture with a bunch of people, and everyone thought it looked fantastic. That little sketch was the culmination of what I had been working on for the past 5 months, and so I was walking on clouds for the next week.

Tell us a little bit about your life outside of game design and gaming: Family? Work? Other interests?

I am a full time college student in the US, pursuing a degree in Electrical Engineering. I do enjoy playing board games quite a lot, and I also play Mafia, Magic the Gathering and League of Legends. I am also a fairly active person, and can be seen quite frequently at the Rockwall and pool at my school.

Do you have any works-in-progress or game ideas you would like to share?

I do have an idea that I am tossing around, but I haven’t been able to solidify it too much since so much of my focus has been on The Lounge. I was always a big fan of tower defense games because of the strategic thought in where to place traps in order to optimize efficiency. So I have been concocting an idea for a game where you essentially are trying to collect a certain amount of objects around the map, and prevent the other players from doing so by erecting traps and barricades as you race around. It’s probably fairly far off, but I think that would be my next project.

What games have you been playing lately? What have you liked, what have you disliked, and why?

I actually went to my friend’s house for a board game night a few days ago. I got to play some cool games, like Tsuro of the Seas, Small World, and Love Letter. I’m actually eyeing Small World as the next game to add to my collection. I like games that involve strategy and planning your moves ahead of time. Kemet, Ticket to Ride, and Magic are among my favorite games for this reason. It’s always exciting when a plan comes together (or fails spectacularly). The games I’m not a huge fan of are ones like Fluxx, where it seems like just random chance as to what happens, and not much thought can be put into it. It’s very linear gameplay. Those kind of game can be fun for a little bit, but I grow tired of them fairly quickly.

Share your favorite game you haven’t designed and why?

That’s a tough question, I like so many! The favorite game that I own is probably Betrayal at House on the Hill. It is a really fun game where crazy things can happen. My favorite moment is this time where we were playing, and the Zombie haunt came up. For those that haven’t played the game, you essentially explore this really creepy mansion, and get chased by monsters. Well, one of the rooms is a Mystic elevator. Now, during this haunt, the Zombie Lord directed probably 10-12 zombies into this elevator, and they are sitting at the top floor of the house. Just chilling, being undead, fun stuff. Now, one of the players was about to die, so he ran into the elevator with the zombies, managed to crash land it into the basement, and stunned the entire group of them. It’s moments like this that make me love this game.

A word of advice to your fellow game designers?

Don’t be afraid to ask for help. If there is one thing that this entire journey has shown me, it is that you have almost nothing to lose by asking for something. The worst someone can say is no, and usually they do it very politely. I could not have pulled this off without the help and advice of so many people, many of whom I wouldn’t have met if I hadn’t put myself out there, and asked them a question. People want to help you; they want to see you succeed. All you have to do is let them.

Anyone you’d like to give a shout out to? (playtesters, design mentors, your friendly local game store, etc.)

First, I really cannot thank the pair of artists I worked with enough, David Forest and Lina Cossette. They were fantastic to work with and produced such amazing artwork.Also, I have to give a shout out to the group of people that I play Mafia with, every week. They have been an amazing group of friends, and have been really supportive of this endeavor. You guys rock!

Tell us how (and where) we can find you (social networks, BGG username, website, cons you plan to attend).

You can contact me at any of the following places. Feel free to voice any questions and concerns, or just say hi!

Issue #204 – Good Cop, Bad Cop Review; Should I Buy Star Realms?

 

The Best in Board Games – In 5 Minutes or Less!
July 28, 2014 – Issue #204

KICKSTARTER CORNER

Distrust and Confusion

A review of “Good Cop, Bad Cop” – By Michelle Mazala

I am a huge fan hidden identity and social deduction games. Werewolf, Resistance, Two Rooms and a Boom, Shadow Hunters, Are You A Traitor?, Panic Station, Win Lose Banana – really, I love them all. So when I saw Good Cop Bad Cop up on Kickstarter I knew this was a game I had to try..….(read the rest)

In the Game

Reviews, previews, walkthroughs, and more…
Today In Board Games Is:Roger Hicks (Editor)
Charlie Ecenbarger (Contributor)
Michelle Mazala (Contributor)
Chris Meeusen (Contributor)
Diana Echevarria (Communications)

“Should I Buy?” Feedback

OK – We’ve run the “Should I Buy” feature in the newsletter for the past week and now it’s time to gather some feedback. Do you find this column useful? What would you suggest to help us improve it? I’d love your feedback – e-mail me at pidgepot@gmail.com – Roger

Articles

Interviews, strategies, and opinions

Should I Buy This?


Star Realms (2013)
Publisher:
 White Wizard Games
Details: 2-6 Players, 20 Minutes
Surveyed Gamers Say:
83% – Plan to Buy It
0% – Will Try It First
17% – Might Play It
0% – Don’t Want ItBuy This If You Like:
Race for the Galaxy, Ascension, Dominion
Coming Next Issue

Doomtown: Reloaded
Are you planning to buy this game or are you not interested? Give us your opinion!

BOARD BUSINESS

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By |July 29th, 2014|Issue|Comments Off on Issue #204 – Good Cop, Bad Cop Review; Should I Buy Star Realms?

Good Cop Bad Cop – Distrust and Confusion within the Police Force

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Good Cop Bad Cop

Published by Overworld Games via Kickstarter
Designed by Brian Henk and Clayton Skancke
Illustrated by Clayton Skancke

Plays 4-8 people
Variable playing time

Preorders available for $14.99:
https://squareup.com/market/overworld-games/good-cop-bad-cop-pre-order?utm_source=overworld-games&utm_medium=embed&utm_campaign=menu_v1

http://www.cardhaus.com/catalog/board_games/good_cop_bad_cop/274243

 

I am a huge fan hidden identity and social deduction games. Werewolf, Resistance, Two Rooms and a Boom, Shadow Hunters, Are You A Traitor?, Panic Station, Win Lose Banana – really, I love them all. So when I saw Good Cop Bad Cop up on Kickstarter I knew this was a game I had to try.

Note: Good Cop Bad Cop accommodates 4-8 players. I have only played games with 5 or more, so I cannot comment on how well this game works with fewer people.

OVERVIEW

Each player at the table receives 3 face-down rolecards (also referred to as Identity cards). Most cards are blue Good Cop cards or red Bad Cop cards. A player’s allegiance is determined by which color is dominant in their set. For instance, a player with 2 blue Good Cop cards and 1 red Bad Cop card is on the Good Cop team.

One player at the table will receive the blue Agent rolecard and become the leader of the Good Cops, and one player will receive the red Kingpin rolecard and become the leader of the Bad Cops. The Good Cops win if they kill the Kingpin; the Bad Cops win if they kill the Agent. Naturally, all of the identity cards have identical backings, so the Agent and Kingpin cards are indistinguishable from the other rolecards on the table.

TURNS

On their turns, players may perform one of four actions:

Take a gun card. Guns are used to kill the Agent and Kingpin (if a non-leader is shot, that person is eliminated from the game)

Fire a gun. The Agent and Kingpin each require two hits in order to be killed.

Peek at one face-down identity card belonging to another player. This is the primary way that players gain information about who belongs to which faction.

Take an equipment card. Equipment cards offer useful miscellaneous abilities mostly used to break or bend rules of the game.

At the end of a turn, a player with a gun may take aim or re-aim at another target.

GAME DESIGN

Turns are usually brief and the game moves fairly quickly. The listed playtime is 10-20 minutes, though in the games I ran, playtime was more like 20 to 30 minutes.

The game seems very clear on paper, but in my experience playing this game with 4 different gaming groups (all with experienced gamers), other players did not find the rules intuitive. It was helpful to have a cheat sheet that lists the four actions a player may take on their turn, but the cheat sheet omits the usage of equipment cards. Rules that were repeatedly forgotten were that a player has to flip an integrity card (role card) face up when grabbing a gun or taking an equipment card, and equipment cards can be used at any time unless the text says otherwise. The wording for some equipment cards was unclear and these observations will be asked to the designers.

PHYSICAL DESIGN

The cards are very straight-forward and cleanly designed on the prototype I received. Good Cop cards are blue with angel halos above police hats; Crooked Cop cards (now renamed Bad Cop?) are red with devil horns. The equipment cards are an easily distinguishable olive, and the guns are a distinct shade of orange. The color palette is reasonable, not flashy, and the text is very legible.

Photo credit: Overworld Games

 

However, the art was redone after the Kickstarter launch:

Photo credit: Overworld Games

The new artwork is more in the style of a comic book. While the design is still clean, I don’t necessarily like that genders were assigned to the cops and I think the comic style is less universally appealing (I think it targets a certain kind of audience).

For those who prefer the original artwork: The complete color Print and Play files featuring the original artwork was made available to all Good Cop Bad Cop Kickstarter backers; perhaps in the future the files will be made public.

COMPARISON

Of all of the social deduction/hidden roles games I know, Good Cop Bad Cop is most like Blood Bound, one of the Kennerspiel des Jahres Recommended games of 2014:

  • Team game with predetermined allegiances
  • Party game
  • Social deduction/hidden roles genre
  • Objective is to identify and kill the other team’s leader
  • Turns proceed clockwise, with each player taking one action per turn
  • When special abilities are used, information about the player initiating the ability is revealed
  • Lying about allegiances is allowed and encouraged
  • Normal artwork (instead of the oft-discussed over-the-top-crazy artwork of Blood Bound)

However, if I had to choose between Good Cop Bad Cop and Blood Bound, I would choose Blood Bound for the following reasons:

Good Cop Bad Cop offers special abilities via equipment cards. The equipment cards can be very powerful and completely game-changing, but there’s an entire deck of different abilities. The randomness of which powers are in play makes it difficult to plan ahead – the equipment cards in my plays frequently foiled sound logical reasoning. Blood Bound offers only 9 special abilities, which are clearly defined on the character cards, and special abilities are one time only.

Good Cop Bad Cop is a game with elimination, whereas Blood Bound is a non-elimination game.

Good Cop Bad Cop can have very uneven teams. It is possible for a person at the table to belong to 1 team while everyone else at the table to belongs to the other. While the undetermined number of players on each team adds a layer of suspense and intrigue, it also means that the game can be a very one-sided affair. In Blood Bound the teams are always even.

RECOMMENDATION

The concept is fun. I appreciated that Good Cop Bad Cop accommodates up to 8 players, I like that turns are short, and I like that it is quick to teach (because all rules apply to all players and there are no variable powers involved), even if rules are forgotten. I absolutely love that it is a very inexpensive game that involves group discussion and trash talking and the thrill that comes from getting a gun and pointing it at someone or seeing a gun pointed at you. I like that lying can be incorporated into the game as a strategy.

However, I dislike that, for a social deduction / hidden roles type game, the roles are publicly revealed too soon. I especially disliked the rule that a player must reveal an Integrity card in order to draw a new Equipment card. I disliked having to answer a ton of rules questions for what should be a quick straight-forward game (I am normally a fantastic games explainer, so this was a new experience for me).

So overall I liked Good Cop Bad Cop but I didn’t love it, and I probably wouldn’t choose it if Blood Bound was available. However, as far as quick portable social deduction games go, Good Cop Bad Cop is a sound game and with some house rules about when identity cards must be revealed, I would recommend it to fans of the genre.

By |July 28th, 2014|Review|1 Comment

Issue #203 – N30N City Rumble. Should I Buy Aquasphere?

 

The Best in Board Games – In 5 Minutes or Less!
July 25, 2014 – Issue #203

TOP NEWS

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Giveaways, specials, and freebies
KICKSTARTER CORNER

In the Game

Reviews, previews, walkthroughs, and more…
Follow Today in Board Games:
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Today In Board Games Is:Roger Hicks (Editor)
Charlie Ecenbarger (Contributor)
Michelle Mazala (Contributor)
Chris Meeusen (Contributor)
Diana Echevarria (Communications)

N30N City Rumble
Photo little

Calling all mutants and street fighters! It’s time to jump into some N30N City RUMBLE, the 5v5 beat-em-up card game! 

The game is set in a fused 80’s-90’s pop-culture/dystopian city, swathed in radioactive waste and neon lights. Combat features 50+ unique items to use, inspired by classic beat em’ up videogames.  There are 20 fighters to choose from, each brandishing three unique super moves, martial arts, and weapon specialties. Victory is reached when a player defeats all of the opponent’s fighters. 

For 2 players, ages 14+. Matches last 45 minutes. You can get the whole game + stretch goals on Kickstarter now for just $29!

Articles

Interviews, strategies, and opinions

Should I Buy This?

Photo little
Aquasphere (2014)
Publisher:
 Tasty Minstrel Games
Details: 2-4 Players, 100 Minutes
31% – Plan to Buy It
19% – Will Try It First
31% – Might Play It
19% – Don’t Want ItBuy This If You Like:
Castles of Burgundy, Bora Bora
Coming Next Issue

Star Realms
Are you planning to buy this game or are you not interested? Give us your opinion!

Designer Wisdom

Curated By Cardboard Edison 

Broken is far easier to solve than almost there. In one, your patient’s leg is gone. Easy. In the latter, you have to be House – Grant Rodiek

Iteration is the heart of design. Constant cycles of playtesting and tweaking sessions between each cycle are the best way to home in on something that is both balanced and fun – Kevin G. Nunn

Set deadlines for your projects and stick to them. Deadlines sharpen the mind and hasten decisions you’ve already really made” – Grant Rodiek

When you can look at the needs of the market and not just your own personal tastes, your games go much further – Kevin Wilson

Knowing when something is good enough is about recognizing missed opportunities. If those opportunities exist, and they haven’t been explored, you may not know it’s good enough – Grant Rodiek

BOARD BUSINESS

Articles for designers, publishers, and other industry professionals
By |July 26th, 2014|Issue|Comments Off on Issue #203 – N30N City Rumble. Should I Buy Aquasphere?

Issue #202 – Indie Game Alliance

 

The Best in Board Games – In 5 Minutes or Less!
July 23, 2014 – Issue #202

TOP NEWS

Listen Up!

Today in Board Games
Week in Review Podcast
#33 – Doug Levandowski of Meltdown Games / Gothic Doctor

HOT DEALS

Giveaways, specials, and freebies
KICKSTARTER CORNER

Sunrise Approaches

A review of “Gothic Doctor” – By Charlie Ecenbarger

300x300-Bogey&DracAlmost everyone has that one game that they latch on to. They bring it to every game day, they keep in their car. Basically, it’s always right where they need it. At this moment in time, Gothic Doctor is that game for me.….(read the rest)

In the Game

Reviews, previews, walkthroughs, and more…

Indie Game Alliance
Indie Game Alliance

The Indie Game Alliance (IGA) is a collective of independent tabletop game developers that have joined together to promote the latest and greatest indie games. They give demos, run tournaments, and preview new titles before they’re released.
The Brotherhood of Minions is the IGA’s team of volunteers who appear at conventions, game stores and events promoting tabletop games made by Alliance partner studios. Volunteers get awesome rewards like games, swag, and limited edition loot. Find out how you can become a Minion at the IGA Website.

Articles

Interviews, strategies, and opinions

Should I Buy This?


Dead of Winter (2014)
Publisher:
 Plaid Hat Games
Details: 2-5 Players, 100 Minutes
Surveyed Gamers Say:
58% – Plan to Buy It
14% – Will Try It First
14% – Might Play It
14% – Don’t Want ItBuy This If You Like:
Battlestar Galactica, Zombicide, City of Horror
Coming Next Issue
Photo little
Aquasphere
Are you planning to buy this game or are you not interested? Give us your opinion!
Follow Today in Board Games:
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BOARD BUSINESS

Articles for designers, publishers, and other industry professionals
Today In Board Games Is:Roger Hicks (Editor)
Charlie Ecenbarger (Contributor)
Michelle Mazala (Contributor)
Chris Meeusen (Contributor)
Diana Echevarria (Communications)
By |July 24th, 2014|Issue|Comments Off on Issue #202 – Indie Game Alliance

RISE OF VIGIL Press Release

image001FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Playdek AND STONE BLADE ENTERTAINMENT release Ascension: RISE OF VIGIL: NEW ENERGY SHARD CARDS ADD TO STRATEGIC GAMEPLAY

Carlsbad, Calif., July 23, 2014 — Playdek, a leading mobile and video games publisher, and Stone Blade Entertainment, a premier developer and publisher of original board and card games, announce the release of Rise of Vigil an in-app expansion for the award-winning mobile game Ascension. Now available on the App Store,the new expansion features a new energy shard mechanic, adding even more depth and strategy to the game.

Ascension: Rise of Vigil includes 46 new center deck cards, including 11 new Monster cards, 24 new Hero cards, 11 new Construct cards and new starting deck art. The new energy shard cards allow gamers to unlock the latent power of Heroes, Monsters and Constructs and challenge players to take a second look at cards that initially might not appear powerful.

“We’re excited to release this new expansion to the popular Ascension series and we thank fans for waiting,” said Joel Goodman, CEO Playdek. “The new energy shard cards energize the gameplay by making players rethink old strategies.”

The game supports real-time and asynchronous online play for one to four players, as well as pass-and-play multiplayer features or play against AI opponents. The expansion also features new background theme art and music.

To download Ascension: Rise of Vigil, go to the App Store (SRP $3.99).

image002About Stone Blade Entertainment

Founded by gaming industry veterans in 2010, Stone Blade Entertainment is a premier developer and publisher of original board and card games.  Formerly known as Gary Games, Stone Blade Entertainment’s products include the new SolForge Digital Collectible Game and the award-winning Ascension deckbuilding game, which has released four expansion sets and been turned into a top selling iOS app.  For more information, visit www.stoneblade.com.

About Playdek, Inc.
Playdek is a premier developer, publisher and platform for the world’s best tabletop gaming. Winner of Boardgamegeek’s Golden Geek award for Best Mobile/Handheld Game (2011, 2012, 2013)  and Board Game of the Year, as well as Reader’s Choice Game of the Year, (2013) and Pocket Tactics’ “Publisher of the Year” (2012) and Board Game of the Year (2013) awards, Playdek brings the best of hobby gaming to digital. 
www.playdekgames.com| facebook/playdek | twitter/playdek

 

image003Press Contacts:

Nina Ronstadt

Ronstadt & Associates PR

(619) 224-3186

Nina@Ronstadtpr.com

By |July 23rd, 2014|Press Releases|Comments Off on RISE OF VIGIL Press Release

Sailor Health Tracker Press Release

mainpage_1Board Game Innovation is proud to announce the addition of the Sailor Health Tracker to our family of patent pending Robinson Crusoe: Adventure on the Cursed Isle Health Trackers.

The Sailor Health Tracker is compatible with the Portal Games Kickstarter/Website published character sheet.  It joins our Health Trackers for both the Portal Games and Z-man versions of the base game as well as the Voyage of the Beagle expansion published by Portal Games.  Purchase price $2.40 +s/h at http://boardgameinnovation.com/

By |July 23rd, 2014|Press Releases|Comments Off on Sailor Health Tracker Press Release

Episode #33 – Doug Levandowski of Meltdown Games / Gothic Doctor

Week in Review is a podcast from Today in Board Games. It summarizes the top news stories from the week and digs a little deeper with interviews, reviews, and more. In today’s episode:

I interview Doug Levandowski of Meltdown Games about his current Kickstarter project Gothic Doctor.

We would love your feedback on this episode! Please leave a comment here or visit us in ITunes and give us a rating and review!

By |July 22nd, 2014|Week in Review|Comments Off on Episode #33 – Doug Levandowski of Meltdown Games / Gothic Doctor