Faith Store Press Release

faith-store

FAITH STORE NOW OPEN, 10% OFF ALL PRE-ORDERS

March 30th, 2015. FAITH: The Sci-Fi RPG was successfully funded last February 12th on Kickstarter. Did you miss it? Fear not: we are offering a pre-order service which will let you get on board this Science Fiction adventure.  

FAITH ended its Kickstarter campaign with a 136% of funding thanks to the help of 576 backers. For those who couldn’t get it first time around, we are offering a second chance through our online store. You will be able to order the core game and every extra component of the game through it, with a 10% discount over retail price (using the following code at checkout: PREORDER10)

faith-components

If you want to own the game, we encourage you to get it now, as the print run is limited and few stores will stock it. In other words, FAITH will be “first come, first serve” from now on.

Set in the Sci-Fi genre, FAITH (faith.burning-games.com) is an RPG that emphasizes role playing through a streamlined gameplay, and warrants immersion thanks to illustrated cards and tokens. The card based gameplay allows players to choose their cards and values and shape their own luck.

Go to FAITH’s online store now: http://store.burning-games.com

10% OFF RETAIL PRICE. USE THE FOLLOWING CODE AT CHECKOUT: PREORDER10

Burning Games Ltd

| Twitter: @burning_games 
| Facebook: burning.games.ltd

hex6d Game Review

1Overview:

I think this game will quickly be a favorite of the family. It has the feel of the classic Parcheesi but with a modern twist! It was fast paced and easy to learn great fun for the whole family!

Appearance/Aesthetics:

The layout is nice the tiles fit together easily. I like the thickness of the tiles you can tell it is well made. The box that the package came in was sturdy.

90dad270aae0cc62133636e7d4f45e99_originalPlaying the Game:

Once the tiles are laid out, you place your players in the center then you are dealt 3 cards each. You then pull a card from the deck and move your piece the number of spaces for that card. The goal is to land your game piece on the spot that matches your three cards.

Final Thoughts:

We played this game multiple times and with every play it gotten better and better. It is very quick to play and keeps the kids on their toes! It was a big hit at my house for family game night and I even had my grandkids want to take turns taking it home to play.

A Recipe for a Wizards Academy – A Guest Post by Gregory Carslaw

BoxArt Imagine for a moment that you are a multiclass thief-chef. You can create a dish to make a statue drool and steal its shoes in one smooth motion. The world is such that only the most legendary chefs can generate their own ingredients (and even then only rarely) so each night you slip into the shadows hoping to obtain the perfect spice for your next dish.

One day, while raiding a pantry the lights flick on and you are caught. A bleary eyed chef spies you raiding her cupboard and her jaw sets. She shakes her head in disappointment and disapproval. “How dare you steal those herbs.” she spits, advancing on you “They won’t combine properly with the spices that you took from next door.” Of course! She’s a chef too and whatever ingredients she has she acquired elsewhere.

And so you talk late into the night about theft and cooking and capers and ideas and meals, in the morning you leave with a bundle of herbs and spices under your arm and her best wishes that your larcenous meal succeed.

This is broadly how it feels to be a game designer.

New designers are always excited to try to come up with new mechanics, but the truth is that it’s exceptionally rare to do so. I think that I may have seen it done exactly twice in my life time. The skill in design is more about combining existing ideas in new ways. Whether we’re aware of them or not, the games we’ve played influence our designs and despite each game being an original creation they each owe something to the games that have come before, right back to the first person who decided that knucklebones roll kinda funny and maybe we should carve some numbers into them. In the run up to getting ready to launch my new game, Wizard’s Academy, I wanted to take a minute to reflect on some of the cooperative games that I’ve played and the things that they’ve inspired me to do in my own design.

Lord of the Rings – Losing is fun

The first cooperative game I ever played was Lord of the Rings and it was brutal. I’d meet with Ben (who owned it) every few weeks or so. We must have played dozens of games and I’m not sure if we ever won. I’m not sure if the game was hard or if we were just inexperienced back then, but that’s beside the point. We lost over and over again and kept coming back. “Maybe this time. Maybe this will be the time we finally win.” It’s a feeling that added something to the game that can’t be captured by all players in a competitive game.

3D Total NyvettaIt was obvious from early playtests that Wizard’s Academy was at its best when everything was going wrong. Players became animated as more of the building caught fire and revelled in just how bad the situation had gotten (and whispered that perhaps they could pull it back). Doing a bit of digging and light survey work I came to the conclusion that people seem to enjoy coops that they lose approximately 70% of the time and that the feeling of pulling things back from the brink of disaster is important – so the game is balanced towards this. Of course different groups have different levels of skill (and tolerances for failure) so each scenario has an easy, normal and hard setting and some are harder than others to begin with – as of this moment there is one scenario that has never successfully been completed on hard.

Shadows over Camelot – Talkers gonna talk

Shadows isn’t strictly a cooperative game, there’s a chance for there to be a traitor, but when I first came across this I played with small groups so as often as not we didn’t have one to contend with. In Shadows you can’t tell anyone what’s in your hand, but that allows you to talk about it in vague terms. The problem is that the cards are numbered 1 to 5 and most people appear to believe that “I’ve got a high card, but it’s not as high as it could be.” isn’t the same as “I’ve got a four.” Regardless of the game, it seems that if players want to communicate something, they’ll find a way, even if they’re forced to resort to elaborate charades.

There’s a reason that cooperative game designers want to limit information to certain players: Coops quickly fall apart when one player decides they’re the brains of the operation and starts giving all of the other players orders about how to play successfully. For Wizard’s Academy I started with the assumption that players will communicate what they know and tried to find ways to stop a single player dominating from that standpoint. I was a psychologist before I was a game designer and there are limits to what the human brain is capable of, so I designed elements of the game to make it more efficient to split planning and reasoning tasks between players rather than trying to give all of the information to the player who thinks they’re the smartest to solve. I could write a whole article on just this, but I’d summarise by saying that overloading working memory is not a perfect solution but overall the playtest results have been very positive and the game generates an above average amount of collaborative decision making.

Sentinel’s of the Multiverse – Sometimes people die.

When I was first introduced to Sentinel’s one of the things that I liked was how it attempted to deal with dead players. If you want a game to have an element of risk, then the consequence for defeat must be meaningful, but you don’t want to have to eliminate a player or push them into a position where their decisions have no impact on the game. Sentinel’s deals with this by having players that die being knocked down and still getting to choose to supply some small but important bonus to their allies each turn. It doesn’t always work but it seems like a good direction to push failure in cooperative games.

Self-immolation is a core concept for Wizard’s Academy, a game in which you can’t set fire to yourself isn’t about magical experimentation. The answer to “what to do with players who make fatal mistakes” turned out to double as the answer for “what to do if the game becomes unplayable but hasn’t hit an end condition”. The mana crystal starts with a pool of mana tokens and whenever a player is killed it burns one to save them. They can also be discarded to solve other problems, by killing threats or rotating rooms, but once they run out the power holding up the building is gone and it collapses to a pile of rubble around you. Every player is in until the end and every problem is solvable – but each mistake brings the group closer to a collective defeat.

Space Alert – Theme changes everything.

I fell in love with Space Alert the first time I’ve played it, I know real time games aren’t for everyone, but it was delightful to me. Generally I’m a mechanics first kind of a guy, but there are so many times that my enjoyment of Space Alert has come down to its theme. There is a huge difference in the emotional reaction to “I put the wrong card down two turns ago and so now my new card won’t work.” and “I’m standing in the interceptor room hammering the launch button again and again with my balled fist, but all that’s happening is that the robots are in the next room looking at me quizzically because I forgot to activate them.”

Game 1This sort of piggybacking is great for helping players to learn rules too. It’s hard to remember that a klark will eliminate a blarglargh if they’re in the same room – but nobody has trouble grasping that you should remove fire tokens from rooms that are underwater. I knew that I wanted a lot of interacting elements so that players can go through the game in the style of the old lady who swallowed a fly. Thematic interactions make the game learnable and playable. If I told you that the game contains fire, water, ice, imps, trolls and demons you could make some educated guesses about how most of those elements interact and the rules can fill in the blanks, allowing for a greater amount of depth from a lesser level of complexity.

Pandemic – Some people just want to watch the world burn

I think that one of the reasons that Pandemic has been such a huge success is that with a very limited set of components it does a very good job of visually displaying how bad the situation is. The visual of a pile of disease cubes scattered across a recognisable map of the Earth is very powerful and “more cubes = more bad” is comfortably inside even the most unimaginative person’s comfort zone. If players thrive on being in a losing position and clawing their way back from the brink of defeat, then the more obviously, immediately and viscerally a game tells them that they’re in a losing position the better.
It’s difficult to playtest for this sort of effect, because what I really need is for unrelated strangers to walk past, glance and the board and say “You guys are stuffed! How did you manage to set the library on fire and freeze the hoard into a solid block of ice in the same game?” Elements have proven pretty successful in this regard, when there are fire tokens everywhere it’s pretty obvious how bad that is. Enemies can be more subtle, as they are less numerous and do not replicate themselves so quickly (conversely, a big fire grows faster than a small fire) but using miniatures to represent them has been a huge visual boost.
Dr. Gregory Carslaw is the lead game designer at 3D Total. He blogs about game design at 3dtotalgames.com. His current game “Wizards Academy” is on Kickstarter now.

Issue #260 – Great Links!

 

The Best in Board Games – In 5 Minutes or Less!
Mar 25, 2015 – Issue #260

News & Announcements

Industry happenings & publisher updates

HOT DEALS

Giveaways, specials, and freebies

In the Game

Interviews, strategies, opinions,reviews, previews, walkthroughs, and more…

KICKSTARTER CORNER

BOARD BUSINESS

Articles for designers, publishers, and other industry professionals
Today In Board Games Is:Roger Hicks (Editor)

Charlie Ecenbarger (Contributor)

Michelle Mazala (Contributor)

Chris Meeusen (Contributor)

Diana Echevarria (Contributor)

Jessica King (Editor)

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Arkham Nights Press Release

dbc704cc6b118c89deef430066cf1116_originalKOUNTZE, TEXAS – March 13 2015

Cavort with the Old Ones in “Arkham Nights”
New Lovecraftian Party Game “Arkham Nights” is Now on Kickstarter!
Dann Kriss Games is excited to announce the launch of its new Lovecraftian party game “Arkham Nights” on Kickstarter!

“Arkham Nights” is a party game for seven to thirty players set in the dark, haunting world of H.P. Lovecraft. Unlike other popular party games of the genre, the townsfolk of Arkham are actively working with the Cultist in their ranks to thwart the Investigators which are trying to halt the return of Cthulhu. Each Character card is taken directly from the writings of H.P. Lovecraft, each with unique abilities they can use to assist the Cultist. It’s up to the Investigator(s) to interrogate the townsfolk, face monsters and madmen, then kill the Cultist before the ritual is complete and the townsfolk succeed in waking Cthulhu from his endless dreams. “Arkham Nights” takes party games in an exciting new direction and is a blast to play!

In addition to copies of the game itself, the project includes other fun and unique rewards such as an Elder Sign pin, a commemorative coin, and the Elder Ritual dice available in both green and purple. The initial Stretch Goals for the campaign will add additional promotional cards for the game with each funding goal achieved.

Backers of “Arkham Nights” will also receive “The Horror in Clay” Kickstarter exclusive promo card with each copy of the game. This card will only be made available to backers of this Kickstarter campaign.

The artwork for “Arkham Nights” was originally hand painted by gothic fantasy artist Ian Daniels with game design and layouts by Dann Kriss. The game will be printed by Liberty Playing Cards located in Arlington, Texas and Gambler’s Warehouse is handling fulfillment for the project. Gambler’s Warehouse has a trusted history as a fulfillment service for Kickstarter campaigns and is well known in the crowdfunding community for their speed of delivery and exceptional care of the items that are being handled.

The “Arkham Nights” Kickstarter launched I at 12:00 pm CDT Friday March 13 and ends on Tuesday March 31 at 11:59 pm CDT. Pledge now and reserve your rewards today!
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For more information regarding “Arkham Nights”, or to schedule an interview with Dann, please email.

Launch of Army Games Press Release

Issue #259 – Millennium Adventures

 

The Best in Board Games – In 5 Minutes or Less!
Mar 21, 2015 – Issue #259

News & Announcements

Industry happenings & publisher updates

HOT DEALS

Giveaways, specials, and freebies

In the Game

Interviews, strategies, opinions,

reviews, previews, walkthroughs, and more…

Millennium Adventures

Millennium Adventures: Crater of Chaos, a unique Role Play Game book with Videos, Maps, and 28mm Miniatures, launches at Kickstarter on April 10th.

According to Cliff Robbins, Creative Director, “We have created a fusion of pen and paper role play game with a modern Game Master Support System. In other words, we have combined an RPG book together with a high-quality video for the Game Masters and Players to see, and then move through, the amazing landscapes of Millennium.” 

As a Pathfinder Compatibility Licensed book, Millennium Adventures: Crater of Chaos, is a 128-page adventure based on the story world of Millennium, a complete world the authors spent twenty-five years creating. The entire project is enhanced by their vision of the ideal GM support system, featuring top-quality Videos (DVD Blue-Ray disc), poster-sized 24″ x 32″ Grid Maps, 24″ x 32″ global Relief Maps, and a complete line of 28mm Miniatures. Other related products can be seen at their Kickstarter preview site (link address below).

The foundation for all the Role Play Game products is the planet, Millennium, a world that encompasses an entire globe, not just one territory or a single kingdom. The detailed relief and parchment maps of both the Upperworld and the Underworld depict more than 3,500 mythological names to compliment the land masses, oceans, and the Underworld.

Cliff Robbins, Kyle Jacobs, and Mel Wayne invite you to visit their Kickstarter Preview siteOnce you are at the site, you can submit your ideas and comments.

KICKSTARTER CORNER

Designer Wisdom

Curated By Cardboard Edison

“Pay more attention to the ideas that return to you. They strike a chord for a reason.” – Jay Treat

“It’s important for game designers to try all kind of games, because it will not only provide inspiration, it will give you a better idea of what you DON’T want to do in your designs.” – Chris Leder

“Designers can especially become attached to clever parts because we want to do really original mechanics. But you have to be ruthless. If it slows the pace of the game too much, makes things too confusing, messes up other parts of the game somewhat, or anything like that – it’s a candidate for the chopping block. A good pace is a virtue unto itself.” – Dan Schnake

BOARD BUSINESS

Articles for designers, publishers, and other industry professionals
Today In Board Games Is:Roger Hicks (Editor)Charlie Ecenbarger (Contributor)Michelle Mazala (Contributor)

Chris Meeusen (Contributor)

Diana Echevarria (Contributor)

Jessica King (Editor)

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Fujian Trader – Last Days Press Release

Fujian2March 16, 2015 – Savannah, GA – Fujian Trader’s Kickstarter campaign has 3 days left to fund! We’re over 50% funded, were a staff pick in less than 24 hours, and have seen similar board game projects make the amount we need and more in the last 48 hours alone! We can do this!

Fujian Trader is a gateway strategy game based on the Selden Map, a recently re-discovered 17th century trading map of East Asia uncovered in the archives of Oxford University’s library. The map, which is the oldest Chinese maritime merchant map still in existence, is currently touring East Asia, and is now considered one of Oxford’s greatest treasures. Back in the 1600s, the Selden Map was privately owned by a Chinese merchant family and shows their trade secrets, i.e. the routes used by them across East Asia.

Sari Gilbert and Robert Batchelor (historian and re-discoverer of the Selden Map) created Fujian Trader with the belief that it will spark players to learn more about the map and how important it is, both historically and economically. The existence of this map challenges a Eurocentric view of the world by championing the idea that China had a much larger impact on 17th century globalization and world economics than previously believed. We believe that by playing Fujian Trader, a game based upon the Selden Map, players will develop an interest for the culture and history behind the game.

Game Features

  • Theme and mechanics based upon the re-discovered Selden Map depicting 17th century trade in the East China Sea

  • Players take on the role of Ming-era merchant families who need to gain the most influence before the Manchu invade and the subsequent end of the game

  • Control ports to produce, trade, and sell the goods of iron, rice, and silk, earning you victory-points and influence

  • Strategize to receive the best exchange rate for your goods

  • Utilize fortune cards, create temporary alliances, and incite rebellions in order to gain more influence and victory-points than your opponents

  • Suitable for 3-5 players, ages 12+, 90 min duration​

Right now, we are on Kickstarter trying to fund the first printing run of the game. If you could help us by backing or spreading the word, we would be very appreciative!

fujian_kickstarterButton

 

Here is our presskit and related links if you are interested in learning further about the game and Thinking Past.

A Look at Zombie Mutation from Pixel Productions

boxxOVERVIEW:

 

In Zombie Mutation™, each player will take the role of one of the six heroes, all fighting to escape the growing Zombie hordes. During the game, players will fight their way through a multi-level 3D game board searching for items that can help them survive, rescuing other survivors and of course killing zombies.

SUMMARY OF GAME PLAY:

Ultimately there can be only one winner or one winning team; however to make it through the various levels of mutating zombies alive; you will find that this game definitely promotes team strategy.  This game can be played individually as a “free-for-all” or as “opposing teams”. (Best when played with 4 players in teams of two).

The main goal of the game is to make it successfully from the top of one of the starting buildings, down through the city streets and to the helicopter rescue on the top of the hospital building with as many survivors as possible. To achieve this, players will need to seek out supplies and survivors indicated by ‘action, supply or survivor icons’ on this grid based game board. When a player becomes adjacent to any of these game icons, all movement stops and the icon is activated. The player must then draw from the corresponding deck of cards being; action, zombie, supply or survivor. The thing about ‘action cards’ is that you never know what you’re going to get; you could wind up drawing anything ranging from much needed health or a weapon to a survivor, zombie horde or even triggering a mutation.

At the beginning of a players’ turn the player must determine what action they will take. A player gets two actions per turn; and may choose one of the following:

Move and Attack      >     Attack and Attack      >     Breakaway and Move

Players will roll one die to determine the number of squares the Hero can move, and two dice for an attack. If a player chooses to breakaway and flee from combat, the player will roll one die with a minus 1 to their movement.

There are many obstacles each player will face during the course of the game. The dice rolling in conjunction with the card drawing aspect of this game creates a very random influence on how the game can and will be played out. Some examples of this might be drawing a key, a rope, a mutation card or even the number of zombies encountered. Depending on where you happen to draw one of these cards it could change your entire strategy by creating opportunity or pressuring you to react and move quickly.

Just like the name of the game implies, zombies can randomly mutate during game play. Drawing a Mutation Card causes all zombies on a specific level to change by increasing their strength or ability.

Zombies move or attack after each player turn. Heroes and Hero Zombies use a slider to track Health Points located on each player card during game play. A single successful roll kills regular zombies.

A little about Hero Zombies:

If a player’s Hero depletes their Health Points and is unable to heal at the start of the next turn, that Hero becomes a Zombie Hero. It is the objective of a Zombie Hero to prevent all remaining Heroes from reaching their objective. Zombie Heroes have the ability to merge with other zombies and survivors on the game board to create a horde controlled by the Zombie Hero. When Mutation Cards are drawn, Zombie Heroes will reap the benefits regardless of the level they are on.

Players can also choose to begin the game as a Zombie Hero playing against the Hero players. The goal for a Zombie Hero is to eliminate all Heroes before they can reach their extraction point.

GAME COMPONENTS:

1          Game Board

3          Buildings

30        Action Cards

42        Supply Cards

30        Survivor Cards

24        Zombie Cards

12        Sliders

6          Hero Miniatures

6          Zombie Hero Miniatures

36        Level 1 Zombie Miniatures

30        Level 2 Zombie Miniatures

30        Level 3 Zombie Miniatures

6          Hero Special Ability Cards

6          Hero/Hero Zombie Player Cards

6          Zombie Player Tiles

54        Action Tiles

9          Movement Trays

 


We utilize several different game mechanics such as a grid system based board, roll and attack, and cards. Our goal was to create a game with such a random dynamic that the outcome would be different every time you played it. We also incorporated some elements of strategy to achieve goals as well as when playing opponents.


We’re huge zombie fanatics here at Pixel. Ever since the first Walking Dead comic book came out we were fans. Years later we were inspired to create a board game based on zombie fan fiction. Aside from that Pixel is also the production design company for Eagle/Gryphon Games, working on games such as Incan Gold, BlockIt, Pastiche, Roll Through the Ages and many of other wonderful games. Being around such a constant barrage of great games got us itching to create a game from scratch ourselves. It’s such a thrill to see a game that we’ve worked on in retail stores.  We kind of want to claim complete ownership to a game like that.

Unfortunately for our game, paying clients come first, and the game kept getting side lined. The perpetual lack of time was probably our biggest hurdle in developing Zombie Mutation™.

Our crew is pretty talented and diverse. We run a full service advertising and website design agency based out of Southern Oregon. We all share many common interests such as the love of problem solving that design provides. Outside of work we do very different things…

Kevin Williams, our head of multi-media and Ecommerce spends most of his ‘free time’ rebuilding Volkswagen buses. Kevin’s a great guy but he’s one of those guys that is great at everything and frankly we all get a little tired of that J.

Paul Quinn is an Owner/Creative Director here at Pixel. He’s also the reason this game is coming to fruition. Paul spent countless hours after work hours and on weekends creating the game play and play testing with family members to get a solid foundation for us to spring board off of. It’s safe to say we probably wouldn’t be releasing this game without his driving force.

Chris London, I’m the one writing all of this down, and I used to enjoy my free time and would spend much of it diving. I’m also an owner here at Pixel, however, at age 41 with a 5 and 3 year old at home, I find myself with very little ‘free time’. In fact, I’m lucky to simply get a bathroom break. Thankfully, I have a very loving wife, who is extremely understanding and supportive of me staying late to ‘play games, eat pizza and drink beer’ as she would put it.

Shannon Crutchfield is an amazing artist with a fantastic sense of humor. Her love of coffee is only second to her love of corgis! Shannon works from our Portland Oregon office and fits into the Portlandia scene quite well. Shh… don’t tell her, she thinks she’s normal.

Dillon Quinn is an intern at Pixel. Dillon is an avid self-taught guitarist following in the footsteps of his favorite band, 5 Finger Death Punch. In his down time he enjoys playing H1Z1 because Zombies rule!

gm-brd

 


 We’re all pretty blessed to get to do what we love.

Remaining Questions:

Do you have any works-in-progress or game ideas you would like to share?

Not right now, Zombie Mutation takes up most of our time!

  • What games have you been playing lately? What have you liked, what have you disliked, and why?
  • Roll Through the Ages, Heroclix, D & D, Settlers of Catan & Cards Against Humanity.

A word of advice to your fellow game designers?

  • Keep pushing ahead and don’t give up!
  • Anyone you’d like to give a shout out to? (playtesters, design mentors, your friendly local game store, etc.)
  • Jordan, Katlyn, Christian, Emily, Shea, Brandon, Dillon & Steve
  • Tell us how (and where) we can find you (social networks, BGG username, website, cons you plan to attend).

Pixel Productions Inc

http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/174448/zombie-mutation

https://twitter.com/ZombieMutation

https://www.facebook.com/zombiemutation

Issue #258 – Hands in the Sea

 

The Best in Board Games – In 5 Minutes or Less!
Mar 17, 2015 – Issue #258

News & Announcements

Industry happenings & publisher updates

HOT DEALS

Giveaways, specials, and freebies

In the Game

Interviews, strategies, opinions,
reviews, previews, walkthroughs, and more…
Today In Board Games Is:Roger Hicks (Editor)
Charlie Ecenbarger (Contributor)
Michelle Mazala (Contributor)
Chris Meeusen (Contributor)
Diana Echevarria (Contributor)
Jessica King (Editor)
Follow Today in Board Games:
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Hands in the Sea

Project image
Hands in the Sea is a new twist on an old favorite from Knight Works. Inspired by Martin Wallace’s A Few Acres of Snow, Hands uses the core deck-building area-control mechanic while providing a radical new play experience with new mechanics and deeper strategies. Set during the First Punic War, Hands is a 1v1 battle between ancient Rome and Carthage. Maneuver your troops and navies to overcome the enemy and claim victory. Multiple paths to victory ensure no two games play alike.
I had the chance to demo Hands in the Sea at BGG.Con last fall and can personally vouch for the quality of this game. It’s already well over-funded on Kickstarter – grab your copy now for only $50.
KICKSTARTER CORNER

Designer Wisdom

Curated By Cardboard Edison

“When designing games there’s no substitute for actual playtesting. It may work perfectly in your head. That’s usually not true in reality.” – Ed Marriott

“Be as objective as you can without discouraging yourself. Be as hard on your own games as you are to the games that you play on a normal game night, but don’t let that discourage you and let you stop making games.” – J. Alex Kevern

“Listen to yourself. If you ever find yourself wanting to apologize for some aspect of your design, take note of it! See if there’s a way you can remove it.” – Matt Leacock

BOARD BUSINESS

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